Pair of Imperial bowls highlight the last Asian auction of the year

26/11/2021     News Stories & Press Release, Chinese, Japanese & South East Asian Art

Roseberys were delighted to present its final Chinese, Japanese & South East Asian auction of the year on the 9th and 10th of November, once more operating across two days. Day one of the sale, on Tuesday 9th November, consisted of Fine Chinese & Japanese works of art spanning from lots 1-235. Within this sale, lots 60-107 were part of a private collection of early Chinese and Korean ceramics amassed since the 1990s. Day two of the auction, on Wednesday 10th November, included Chinese and South East Asian works of art, ranging from lots 236 to 706.

Bill Forrest, Head of sale commented: ‘The market for Chinese art remains extremely strong, though with a seemingly renewed focus on well-provenanced fine objects of great rarity as demonstrated by the success of day one’s curated selection of fifty lots of fine Chinese works of art, only four of which were unsold.  As ever, Roseberys were proud to exhibit a selection of highlights from the two-day sale during Asian Art Week in London, in a gallery on Bury Street.  The buzz around the event continues to demonstrate that London remains the international hub for the sale of Asian art.’


A pair of fine Chinese porcelain yellow-ground famille rose 'medallion' bowls, Shendetang Zhi, Daoguang period, circa 1831-1850


Leading the highlights within the sale was lot 42, a pair of fine, well provenanced, Chinese porcelain yellow-ground famille rose 'medallion' bowls, Shendetang Zhi, Daoguang period, circa 1831-1850. The level of interest they garnered indicates the sheer strength of the market and the continued appetite for the finest porcelains. Eleven telephone lines and live internet bidding across all four platforms competed to secure these bowls. Against an estimate of £8,000-£12,000, the bowls made £65,000, going to a telephone bidder in China.

 

 


A Chinese Dehua porcelain white glazed figure of Wen Chang, 17th century

 

Lot 4 was the second-highest value lot within the sale, a Chinese Dehua porcelain white glazed figure of Wen Chang, 17th century. Despite damage to this Dehua porcelain figure, it was hotly contested – indicating collectors are willing to overlook elements of damage. Due to a combination of good provenance, high quality, and rarity, this lot sold for £22,000, against an estimate of £1,500-£2,500, to a telephone bidder in China.


A Chinese bronze archaic wine pouring vessel, jue, late Shang dynasty, 12th-11th century BCE


Elsewhere in the sale (lot 49) was a Chinese bronze archaic wine pouring vessel, jue, 12th-11th century BCE. Hailing from the late Shang dynasty, this represented the quintessential Chinese art form.  Finely cast with Taotie masks, these vessels were used in religious ancestor ceremonies to pour wine.  Coming from a private collection, which was mostly acquired from the prestigious London dealership Bluett, with an estimate of £6,000-£8,000, this lot sold for £27,500, to a RoseberysLive online bidder.

 


A rare Chinese gilt metal and cloisonne enamel meiping, 17th century

(Lot 463) Entered onto the market with a price of £20,000-£30,000, was lot 463, a rare Chinese gilt metal and cloisonne enamel meiping, 17th century. The meiping, that came from a Private Collection in London was decorated with scrolling lotus and foliage, above a band of stiff leaves on a turquoise ground, measuring 29cm high. This lot was sold to a Beijing-based online buyer via RoseberysLive for £25,000.


A Chinese zitan archaistic brush pot and brush washer, 18th/19th century

 

Lot 521, a Chinese zitan archaistic brush pot and brush washer, 18th/19th century was entered onto the market with a price-guide of £4,000 - £6,000. The central brush pot flanked by carved stylised dragons, within the pot was geometric motifs and carved ruyi heads, overall measuring 15cm high. This pot proved to be another highlight in the sale that far exceeded its top estimate. This lot sold for £18,750 to an online RoseberysLive bidder based in Canada.

 moonflask


A large Chinese porcelain Ming-style blue & white moonflask, Qianlong period

Lot 46, within the day one sale of Chinese and Japanese works of art, was a large Chinese porcelain Ming-style blue and white moonflask, made during the Qianlong period.  Bill Forrest commented on the highlight: ‘This is an exceptionally rare finely painted Qianlong period blue and white moonflask.  One of five lots from the private collection of Maurice Collis, this flask has an intriguing story to tell – during the firing process, the vase slumped under its own weight, resulting in a significant lean from front to back.  We know that so many of these vessels collapsed in the kiln due to their size and shape, but this survived the rigorous quality control process, for what reason we can only speculate.’ The impressive moonflask amassed lots of pre-sale and auction day interest, eventually realising the price of made £17,500, going to a telephone bidder based in the Netherlands.

 


A Chinese zitan square bitong, 18th century

Lot 522, a Chinese zitan square bitong, 18th century, finely carved to the exterior with a continuous expansive landscape with figures in a boat approaching a pagoda on a cliff edge, measuring 14.5cm high was another highlight in the sale. The bitong made over double its top estimate. Entered onto the market with an estimate of £4,000-£6,000, the lot realised the price of £15,625, going to a telephone bidder in Hong Kong.


A Chinese porcelain monochrome clair-de-lune vase, meiping, 19th century


Lot 374, was the surprise highlight of the sale, a Chinese porcelain monochrome clair-de-lune vase, meiping, 19th century. With high shoulders and gently tapering sides, covered in an all-over pale blue even glaze, the meiping that measured 16.3cm high made £15,000 against an estimate of £600-£800. Five telephone bidders battled it out for this lot. It finally went to a telephone bidder based in London.

 


A Sino-Tibetan gilt-bronze figure of Manjushri, 18th century

A highlight from East Asia was lot 519, a Sino-Tibetan gilt-bronze figure of Manjushri, 18th century. Seated in vajrasana on a lotus base, his right hand brandishing a sword, a flowering lotus blossom issuing from a leafy stem beside his left arm, the bronze figure measured 16.5cm high. Coming with an estimate of £1,000-£1,500, this bronze sold for £10,000 to a telephone bidder based in Beijing.

 

 

Select your interests to receive news and catalogue updates.

  

 

More News