Imperial porcelain bowl found in kitchen cupboard valued at £30,000-40,000

1/07/2020     News Stories & Press Release, Chinese, Japanese & South East Asian Art

LONDON: As UK salerooms swing into action after lockdown, Roseberys is gearing up to offer over 630 lots of art and antiques from China, Japan and South East Asia. Prized rarities are set to lead this rescheduled sale on July 28, including an exquisite pair of Chinese imperially inscribed wall vases and an imperial porcelain marriage bowl spotted in a local kitchen cabinet. The auction also contains 40 Chinese scroll paintings consigned from a chateau in Switzerland. Prospective buyers will be able to return to the saleroom to handle objects in the flesh while a virtual viewing service will be available for those unable to attend in person.

Lot 87: A rare pair of Chinese porcelain imperially inscribed wall vases, Qianlong marks and of the period | £20,000-30,000 + fees

Lot 87: A rare pair of Chinese porcelain imperially inscribed wall vases, Qianlong marks and of the period | £20,000-30,000 + fees

 

Bill Forrest, Head of Department at Roseberys, comments“Postponed from May 19 due to the troubling circumstances, this auction is highly anticipated and will be offered in an environment which will see prospective buyers finally return to the saleroom to handle objects in the flesh. Undoubtedly the market for Asian works of art remains strong, and we have put in place a thorough condition report and extra image service. For those who require more detailed information and who cannot attend the saleroom to view specific lots, we are offering a virtual viewing service where we can discuss specific lots live via video link.We are privileged to be offering such a breadth of fine objects, spearheaded by a wonderful pair of imperially inscribed Qianlong mark and period porcelain wall vases (lot 87).  We are also offering a collection of scroll paintings from a castle in Switzerland, an imperial porcelain marriage bowl from a local kitchen cabinet, and a fine collection of Japanese woodblock prints.

Estimated at £20,000-30,000 (+ fees), the imperially inscribed Qianlong mark and period porcelain wall vases were inherited in c.1950 and come from a private West London collection. They are finely decorated with lotus blooms connected by twisting scrolls symbolising purity on a ruby body. The Imperial poem inscribed on each was composed by the Emperor Qianlong in the wuyin year (1758) to express his delight in seeing a wall vase filled with a flower hanging inside of his sedan chair on the way to a hunting trip. Of the 320 Qianlong wall vases recorded in the collection of the Palace Museum in Beijing, about 138 of them are inscribed with poems by the emperor.  Wall vases, also known as wall pockets or sedan chair vases, became one of the Qianlong Emperor’s favourite types and developed significantly during his reign. Pairs are seldom offered on the market. Enhancing this duo’s rarity is the yangcai (foreign colours) decoration, which was introduced by European Jesuit craftsmen to the Qing court around 1685, adapting the European techniques of enamelling on metal. Developed in the Jingdezhen imperial workshops under the patronage of the Qianlong Emperor, this style is representative of the superb quality of porcelain production achieved during the Qianlong reign. [Lot 87]

Lot 86: A fine Chinese porcelain doucai bowl, Jiaqing mark and of the period | £30,000-40,000
Lot 86: A fine Chinese porcelain doucai bowl, Jiaqing mark and of the period | £30,000-40,000

 

Also offered in the sale is a fine Chinese imperial porcelain doucai marriage bowl spotted in a kitchen cabinet among everyday crockery at a house five minutes from Roseberys saleroom in West Norwood. The bowl is delicately detailed with mandarin ducks swimming amidst large lotus blooms, a popular scene symbolising a harmonious union used on many items given as marriage gifts. Notable for carrying a period Jiaqing mark (most bear a later Daoguang mark), bids are invited in the region of £30,000-40,000 (+ fees). [Lot 86]

 

Lot 297: A Chinese rhinoceros horn libation cup, 17th century | £20,000-30,000 + fees;

Lot 297: A Chinese rhinoceros horn libation cup, 17th century | £20,000-30,000 + fees

A fine 17th century Chinese rhinoceros horn libation cup carved with chrysanthemums, carries hopes of £20,000-30,000 (+ fees). Chrysanthemum-decorated libation cups symbolise long life and are also linked to the hermetic poet Tao Qian (365-427 AD) who planted numerous  chrysanthemums at his rural estate. The flower has since come to symbolise the literati ideal of tranquil solitude in the 'autumn' of one’s life. The cup comes from a private West Country collection, inherited from the grandparents of the present owner in the 1960s, together with a 17th/18th century Chinese chenxiangmu (aloeswood) brush pot, finely carved with bamboo and pine trees estimated at £6,000-8,000 (+ fees). [Lot 297] [Lot 296]

Lot 85: A rare Chinese porcelain 'Sanduo' bowl, Daoguang mark and of the period | £15,000-20,000 + fees

Lot 85: A rare Chinese porcelain 'Sanduo' bowl, Daoguang mark and of the period | £15,000-20,000 + fees

 

A rarity in the form of a Chinese porcelain sanduo bowl with a Daoguang mark and of the period is estimated at £15,000-20,000 (+ fees). The piece is finely painted in famille rose enamels to the exterior with fruiting branches of lychee, peaches, and pomegranates representing a variation of the auspicious sanduo (‘three abundances’) motif. [Lot 85]

 

Lot 295: A rare Chinese cinnabar lacquer tiered double lozenge shaped box and cover, Qianlong period | £25,000-35,000 + fees

Lot 295: A rare Chinese cinnabar lacquer tiered double lozenge shaped box and cover, Qianlong period | £25,000-35,000 + fees

 

Estimated at £25,000-35,000 (+ fees) is a rare Chinese cinnabar lacquer tiered box and cover from the Qianlong period. The double-lozenge shape, also known as fang sheng, is one of the Eight Precious Things and is a popular symbol used in decorations during the Ming and Qing dynasties. Two five-clawed dragons chasing a flaming pearl formed as a stylised shou character are finely carved to the cover. [Lot 295]

Chinese Vase

Lot 37: A rare Chinese porcelain powder blue ground bottle vase, Kangxi period | £5,000-8,000 + fees

A Chinese porcelain powder blue ground Kangxi period bottle vase noted for its large size and rare underglaze of blue and copper red is estimated at £5,000-8,000 + fees. The 41cm high piece, which features a dragon to the slender neck and two mythical beasts to the body, comes from a private collection in Germany and was acquired by the family of the current owner prior to 1920. [Lot 37]

Lot 439: YU ZHIDING (Attributed to, 1647-1716), ink and colour on silk | £200-400 + fees

Lot 439: YU ZHIDING (Attributed to, 1647-1716), ink and colour on silk | £200-400 + fees

Also on offer is a private collection of around 40 Chinese scroll paintings consigned from a chateau in Switzerland. Among the group is a large scroll painting attributed to Yu Zhiding (1647-1716) depicting dignitaries approaching a palace terrace and guided at a modest £200-400 + fees. Zhidang was a Yangzhou-based painter who worked for a time at the Imprerial Painting Academy. Specialising in portraits, his works are represented in the Palace Musuem in Beijing. (Lot 429) 

 

Chinese, Japanese & South East Asian Art

Tuesday 28 July, starting at 10am

View the fully illustrated catalogue here. 

Contact Head of sale Bill Forrest for more information: billforrest@roseberys.co.uk

Viewing information 
Viewing by appointment

Thursday 23rd – 10am-5pm

Friday 24th – 10am-5pm

Sunday 26th – 10am-2pm

Monday 27th –  10am-5pm

Please contact clientservices@roseberys.co.uk to book an appointment

 

 

 

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